JULY 05, 2020

Stranger than fiction

BY THE PASYAL TEAM
ART BY VISUAL HABIT DESIGN

Have a sensational reading experience with these dystopian classics.

Dystopian fiction is such an exciting genre to consume because while it always transports the reader to an otherwordly dimension, the messages it alludes to always hit so close to home.

Before TV shows like Black Mirror, Westworld and Altered Carbon raised our goosebumps with their depictions of distorted yet familiar worlds, these classics were already present to satisfy our fixation for dystopia. Thankfully, you can still get a copy of these books in bookstores such as Fully Booked, Power Books, Biblio and National Bookstores, located in all Ayala Malls.

Instead of the usual synopses which you can read about in other sites, we tried to be a bit more succinct and creative in our description of these books below. Let us know which ones piqued your interest the most!

Now grab a large cup of coffee and settle into a comfy seat as these reads will immerse you into eerie worlds that will have you coasting from fantasy to reality.

1984, George Orwell

A world where people have been conditioned to believe that the clock “strikes thirteen,” and where “two plus two equals five.” In George Orwell’s version of ’80s London, fake facts are bible truth.

The Giver, Lois Lowry

A young man tasked to remember the past in order to protect a sordidly organized yet secretly oppressed society learns that it is important for people to never forget their history.

Animal Farm, George Orwell

The animal “citizens” elect a new leadership, believing they will bring down the oppressive farm owner—but end up suffering even worse horrors under its sinister oligarchic rule.

The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood

In the book, the protagonist Offred gets intermittent flashbacks of her old, beautiful life, set against the previous state of the world she once lived in—but easily jolts back to the dreadful new normal.

Brave New World, Aldous Huxley

A world where inequality and the oppression of freedom is glossed over by technology and science, where freedom of expression and emotions are deemed crude and primitive.

The Chocolate War, Robert Cormier

Terrible violence is enacted upon people who “dare disturb the universe,” the concept of ‘universe’ being a school ruled by corruption and bullying.

Farenheit 451, Ray Bradbury

Books—said to contain information that will save society from its own destruction—are burned because the powers-that-be deem them subversive.

Never Let Me Go, Kazuo Ichiguro

Certain people, who have dreams, hopes, feelings and emotions like the rest, are considered second-class citizens simply because of their genetic makeup—which they obviously had no control over when they were born.

Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins

Millions are hungry. And at their expense, the rich have more than they need. Because of this, people at the impoverished end of the spectrum are forced to do everything to survive.

Visit the bookstores at the Ayala Mall nearest you!